Spotlight on Women in Tech: Lisa Malarkey of Phoenix Software

  • At License Dashboard we are, and always have been passionate about creating and maintaining a diverse place of work. One of our employees has been working with the Women in Technology Community by building a space where women can support each other, share advice and work to narrow the gender gap.

We asked some esteemed women within the IT industry to tell us a bit about their experiences within the workplace, here’s what Lisa Malarkey from Phoenix Software had to say:

When did you first start in the IT industry and what drew you to it?

I started in IT 24 years ago.  This is for the same company that I work for now! The job I originally applied for did not attract me for the fact that it was at an IT company.  It was because I had worked with creating new systems, processes and specifications under BS5750.  Phoenix was working towards similar standards and looked to expand their team to action this.

My original role was administration based within Phoenix.  This gave me a good grounding for how the business operates.

As a woman, have you faced any challenges within working environments?

Not really, the company was originally owned by two females, therefore culturally there was never any discrimination about being a woman, or that I wasn’t actually technical.  The growing working environment required skills of all sorts, so I fitted well as I’m good at adapting to different projects and looking at how processes and the business can progress with improved systems.

It’s now well known that a lot of industries have been highlighted due to pay gaps between men and women, do you think this is the same within the IT industry?

I’ve not encountered this, each department would have its own pay scale dependent on experience, qualifications and productivity and this was applied regardless of gender.

In recent years there has been an influx of women in all workplaces, but it’s not equal to men, I read somewhere that men are 30% more likely to be promoted to a managerial position than women.

Why do you think this is and what can organizations do to prevent discrimination and maintain equality when looking at hiring, salaries and promotions?

Again, this hasn’t really applied where I’ve worked in IT.  Woman were very predominant in the management team when I first joined.  All the managers that were promoted or recruited were done so on their experience and personality.  We can’t dictate who will apply for a position, but internally if someone is showing an aptitude and/or skillset that could be enhanced then this would be encouraged.  It didn’t seem to matter if they were male or female – it is more about the right person for the job.

Do you have any advice to women starting out in the IT industry?

I didn’t start out working in an IT department within an IT company, so I’d say give it a go, you never know where your skillset and attitude may take you.  Experience counts for a lot and qualifications can be gained to further enhance this and keep up with the latest methodology and technology.

you never know where your skillset and attitude may take you.

What resources and support are available for women in IT?

I believe these are the same for anyone, these offerings are there without discrimination of gender.

What’s the biggest lesson you have learnt as a women in technology?

Working in IT has is all about the communication and collaboration with other within your team and company.  The success of all our projects comes from these core values.  On my own I can’t deliver the solutions required, but part of a team that you can work and communicate well with we can tackle any challenge!

part of a team that you can work and communicate well with we can tackle any challenge

Keep an eye out for the next blog in the Women in Technology series and if you would like to take part, please don’t hesitate to get in contact.

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Libby Bagley

Libby Bagley

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